Author Archives

B Sudharsan

B Sudharsan is an Indian poet, English instructor, and former journalist. He is the founding editor-in-chief of The Literary Juggernaut and dwells in Delhi, India.

The Year That Wasn’t: An Homage to 2020

This year we worked from home, to our workplaces said ‘buh-bye!’
And then at home we joyed with our beloved ménage, kinsfolk.
When March bade to each of us that sad and alarming ‘Hi’,
we did confine ourselves to our homes, thus becoming broke.

You Are Not a Poet

You are not a poet if you know just to rhyme;
You are not a poet if you don’t know to chime.
You are not a poet if you just use dead words;
You are not a poet if you can’t deal with girds.

‘I Can Write All Day Without Looking up Once’

The morning writer, whose list of favourite authors changes all the time, has had her short stories featured in the award-winning anthologies Elmwood Stories to Die For and Mayhem in Memphis as well. ‘My stories also appear in Low Down Dirty Vote VII, Stories Through the Ages: Baby Boomers Plus 2019,’ she says. We also learn that the online literary journal Backchannels published one of her stories in the spring and another story won second place in the online Short Storyland 2019 competition.

Silenced Sound

Could you behold the setting ball of fire a while?
Could you discourse with each hill that’s adorned by snow?
The path we’re treading on will take us one more mile
So we may touch the clouds that move in that destined row.
Oh, when the sky does gain its charm and glow at night;
We’ll wander each lane that reflects the Moon’s light.

‘It’s Never Too Late to Do What You Love’

While becoming an author was not something the author had thought of in her childhood, she stresses that because she always possessed a vivid imagination, she could not but put pen to paper. ‘As many ideas constantly swim around my head, it is only natural for me to feel the only way to eliminate the thoughts is to write them down,’ she tells us.

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!

Carrying gifts, comes the Santa;
He guffaws upon seeing us.
Riddling and giggling, he dances,
Illuded by the merry fuss.
Santa shakes the bag he carries,
Times each move ere catching a bus
Merry Christmas! He hoys cool gifts.
And says, ‘You shall grow happy thus.’
Shouts of elation now, no fuss.

Davide Mana’s Awe-Inspiring Story

While Mr Mana tries to keep a schedule, writing from 10 AM to 5 PM, with a short break for lunch and several pauses, he concedes that many unexpected events tend to shatter his schedule. ‘But that’s life I guess,’ he states. ‘Also, I sometimes just sit at the keyboard and write for the fun of it – without a deadline or a target market, or a contract. Especially when the going gets rough, and it happens, writing is a good way to clear the mind and stop worrying about those things you can’t control anyway,’ he adds.

We Are One

I see Him in the seed, the bough, the tree
I see Him in your smile, your cry, your pout
I see Him in scenes that are, that can’t be
Oft marvel do I at His mighty clout
He knows it all well but without a scout
The worlds exist so He may joy and fun
He wills it so rivers flood, there is drought
None but Him can make us perceive we’re one

Sunrays

I oft wonder how the ball of light and fire not once reels;
Moving with a wondrous flair, the Sun hardly seems hoary.
Oh! Behold the skewing rays of our majestic Sun that wheels!

A Hawaiian Writer’s Inspiring Tale

She wrote the Christian superhero series entitled ‘Science, Meet God’ while being crippled for four years after having undergone knee surgery at the age of twenty four. ‘I was on the verge of paralysis before a doctor finally figured that slipping disks had severed my spinal cord in half. I had spinal surgery in 2014. The healing process was slow and painful, and I would like to thank Cliff for being the best nurse a girl could ever hope for,’ she shares with us.

The Countryman

Every Sunday he herds cattle,
battling many hardships, pains;
Like a cloud that seems to prattle,
rattles all the weeds for gains.
Dancing and rejoicing, he heads
to the lands where grounds are beds.
Isled, forlorn are those plain lands;
People there don rustic bands.

Blind in Love

We can be each other’s love if you will;
Shall I beseech you thus to feel my love
So both may joy in little things, have fun?
Be guided not by fame but one’s own will!
In shame, guilt and regret we shan’t down bow;
Love. Oh, that feeling we should not once shun.

Compersion

I can’t feel bad if good you do;
I can’t rejoice when you so rue.
I can’t say lies and myself fool;
I can’t break that unspoken rule.
For in you I see the holy spark,
Which does guide me as well in the dark.

Meditating on Death, Adventure, Flawed Humanity

The author tells us that Nevada Noir is a dark, atmospheric trilogy of intertwined tales of greed and temptation in the Nevada badlands. ‘In these three dark and brooding short stories, set in and around the US state of Nevada, a cast of disparate characters struggle with greed and temptation and the cursed lure of easy money. An old man goes in search of his son in the aftermath of a terrible storm, a couple down on their luck make a life-changing discovery, and an ex-cop has one last impossible decision to make,’ he explains, adding, ‘It’s an action-packed meditation on death, temptation and flawed humanity.’

Conditionals in English

Conditionals allow you to express a wide range of scenarios. You can talk about an event that is unlikely to take place with the help of a conditional. Similarly, you can use conditionals to talk about purely imagined scenarios or hypothetical situations. You can also use conditionals to talk about something likely to happen in the future. Hypothetical outcomes that have got to do with the past are also expressed using conditional sentences. In short, they help you articulate your thoughts in the best possible manner, and that’s why they are considered significant.

‘Write for Yourself’

Her second book entitled ‘A Storm of Magic’ happens to be a YA Fantasy. Speaking about the book, Ms Laino says, ‘Being brought back from the dead is an impressive trick, even for magician Darien Burron. Now he must try and use his sleight of hand to swindle modern-day witch, Mirah, to sign her power away, or end up a tormented demon in the afterlife. Meanwhile, sixteen-year-old Mirah is starting to lose control of her powers. After an incident at her aunt’s Witchery store, Mirah is sent to a secret coven to learn to control her abilities. While she is away, Mirah meets up with a soft-spoken clairvoyant, a brazen storm witch, and the creator of dark magic itself. The young woman must learn to trust in herself before she loses herself entirely to the darkness that hunts her.’

No Attitude, Just Gratitude

I see, I be, I walk, I talk;
Each morning I rise with a smile.
I read, I feed, I rock, don’t mock,
Have to cover many a mile.

‘It Takes Time to Find a Name For Yourself’

Letting us know that she is a pantser, meaning she tends to start with a concept and characters and allows the story to unfold thereafter, Ms Martine, who used to be fluent in Spanish but has now lost touch with the language, says her debut romance novel entitled ‘dibs’, a finalist for romance in the 2020 Kindle Book Awards, came to her almost fully-formed, and she simply had to write it down as she saw the movie in her mind.