‘I Always Was a Poet and Ever Shall Be’

With a doctorate in education and various other academic qualifications, Mike, who can also speak a bit of French, thanks to his working in Paris, tells us he is up for undertaking a master’s degree by research into Caribbean writing. ‘It would be my third!’ he exclaims. Maintaining that he is as full-fledged a writer as he ever can be, Mike lets on that his tryst with writing is destined to continue. ‘More poems will inevitably get written’, he avers over the course of the interaction, adding that he hopes to attend literary festivals in the future.

The Day Turned Dark

The day turned dark, the winds got wild,
Commoving feelings, numbing souls
On India’s hills where peeps are mild
With a nature that warms men’s wholes.

Bonafide Bonds

Never shall you out of forlornness despond,
For answers looked for are engraved in your soul;
And when your thoughts, words and deeds correspond,
Your self will truly form many a bonafide bond.

‘I Cringe a Lot When I Read My Old Stories’

Author Emma Joy Hill has been telling herself stories for as long as she can remember; and when she learned to write in sentences, writing down a story was one of the first things she did. ‘I remember writing a story called The Pretty Trees. It was inspired by a particular morning when sparkling frost covered all the trees in the city,’ says the Ontario-based Canadian writer, who is also well-versed in Dutch, beginning her interaction with The Literary Juggernaut. 

Thanksgiving

Kind we’ll be to our kith and kin,
Smile at them, each person we see.
Gratitude shall be the slogan,
Insides will soon turn clutter-free.

The Morning Song

This is the morning song
I sing to you,
rushing into the billow of your embrace,
ascending to the sky in your eyes,
flowing into your oceanic love,
eloping with your wind-withered soul…

Witnessing Winter

Each morning as the smog enshrouds this town,
I am benighted by my trembling mind;
As I breathe, not being ware of the act,
My heart chokes while I cough phlegm up and frown.
And as my mind meanders through the past,
The now is slain with a might unheard of.

‘Poetry is a Journey Without an End’

English poet Jim Khan has always had a passion for writing. ‘Growing up in a disadvantaged environment meant the only safe place was in my own head and the local library,’ the 41-year-old Nottingham-based author, whose everyday life is very much like Sisyphus rolling his boulder up the mountain only to have it fall back onto his head again, says, beginning his interaction with The Literary Juggernaut. 

The Soul of Nature

Today as I flip through the dusty dailies,
The vagaries of nature read of and about
Storm my mind with impressions from the gory past
And subtly rain down sorrow, angst, and ill luck
I’d happened on not less than seven years ago.

Roots

Life
Is like a flourishing tree,
And every other person you know
Is its leaf.
Leaves are its beauty;
And some may not be more than a burden.
But at the end of the day
Leaves shed off.

Draught of Air

The draught of air won’t slay this searing heat,
a heat that now has slain the cold we bore
for years in our hearts till love came to fore
The day I proffered we go out to eat.

The Buzz Around Bosco

Author Cat Ritchie knows the art of painting pictures with words, and her book entitled Bosco and the Bees stands testimony to that. When we began reading the book, we’d thought it would be just another fairy tale that tends to end with a moral. Nonetheless, when we started flipping the pages of the spellbinding novel, we were awestruck and captivated by the awe-inspiring characters, each of which has something moralistic to convey in a manner that is both funny as well as alluring. 

Will I Ever Get What I’ve Hankered For?

I will never get what I’ve hankered for;
So I shall not want to imagine that
My dreams will turn into reality;
This might appear too sudden now, but
I’m foreordained to be good for nothing;
And I shall thus not allow you to say
I do deserve everything wonderful.

‘Let Nothing Stop You’

Author Nicolas W King first started writing when he was thirteen years old. ‘And it was a bad X-Men fanfiction,’ laughs the writer, beginning his interaction with The Literary Juggernaut. Stating, nonetheless, that his first original story was a one-act play, which he gave to his theater teacher in high school, Nicholas, who works his day job in IT Support and tends to write at night, lets on with a smile, ‘She enjoyed it but could see I needed a lot more practice!’

I Observe

His water brush draws
the mirror for the sky:
the vast lake beneath
captures the continuum
on its refractive surface
in deepening silence

My Favorite Teacher

Her voice was poised,
and when she addressed us
for the first time
a wave of silence descended
as if it were preordained
that a shrilled silence would dawn
when she worded the thoughts
she had in her mind,
for silence was a word
not in the dictionary
the students of St Mary’s used.

My Imaginary Beach

Come join me on my imaginary beach
The night will be warm, the moon full
The sand will sparkle in Luna’s light
The calm ocean will set the rhythm
With waves lapping quietly upon the shore

Wish I Were With You

Oh, I wish I were with you up above
So we both might make love afresh each day
And pen grand sonnets that no man shall shove
Out of their dying yet unending way.

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Erich von Hungen

Having been interviewed by Vatsarah Stavyah (you can read the interview here), I can say that The Literary Juggernaut is AHEAD OF THE PACK. It is perceptive, astute, caring. It is curious, interested, unafraid, committed. It is there. It is all that you would most want from a literary journal, especially now with so much overload. It is a path, that is, to something new and true and real. Of all the journals out there, The Literary Juggernaut is just that, a juggernaut, and it is worth your time. Trust it. Read it.

Jesse S Frankel

To the owners and operators of The Literary Juggernaut, I’d like to thank you for giving me the opportunity to express my thoughts in an interview I recently did for you. Many authors try to get some form of public recognition and publicity for their efforts; you have given me both. I only wish that more blog sites would do the same!

As a writer, it is never easy. We spend long hours writing and rewriting, advertising on Twitter and other forums, chatting with fellow writers on techniques, and just plain doodling around until inspiration hits. It is good to know sites like yours exist that help us spread the word about our work.

Once again, my greatest thanks!

Kelly Miller

I wanted to thank you for interviewing me on your e-gazette, The Literary Juggernaut. You posed a number of interesting questions, and it was a wonderful experience.

Without the support of a big publishing house, indie authors must find every opportunity they can to reach new readers. Your efforts to spotlight indie authors and their work, introducing them to your readers is much appreciated!