Tag: Quotes

‘Writing Is Art, a Calling’

Author T C Weber is a morning person, and he begins his day with what he loves doing most: writing. In an exclusive email interaction with The Literary Juggernaut, Mr Weber, who is a member of Poets & Writers and the Maryland Writers Association, says when working on a novel, his goal is to write one scene each day, schedule permitting. ‘I ensure that I write something every morning, even if it’s just random thoughts or a few paragraphs. Long scenes may take several days,’ explains the author, who also knows to speak Spanish besides a bit of Russian and Japanese.

‘I Love Idleness, Walking, Being a Flaneur’

What you must understand is that poetry is not simply expressing oneself – not for me. That would seem more suited to an essay. Rather, poetry is a way of being and of seeing as if it were another sense in the way of taste or touch. And with this sense, it becomes a way of relating to life at its smallest as well as its largest. For the poet, it is every day and everywhere. It is who and how you are. Poetry is, at its fullest, a relationship. And the words are the bi-product of that relationship, that way of being. They are the conversations that you, the reader, are allowed to overhear – but they are not in and of themselves the whole thing. Birds stroke distance through the air, spiders build webs, and in the same way, poets write. The significant fact, though, is that what they write; poems are not about, they are not faint reflections, but rather, poems are, are the thing itself – as is the distance, as is the web.

What’s the Difference Between ‘Will’ and ‘Shall’?

In this post, our focus will be on explaining the key differences between the modal verbs ‘will’ and ‘shall’. Many students have the misconception (a wrong opinion) that we use ‘will’ with the second person (you) and third person (he, she, they, it) pronouns and ‘shall’ with the first person pronouns, namely ‘I’ and ‘we’. And while it is true that ‘will’ can be used with any pronoun to denote a future course of action, there are some situations when we cannot use ‘will’. Doing so may not only change the meaning of the sentence, but the sentence may end up being grammatically incorrect as well.

Key Differences Between Simple Past Tense and Present Perfect Tense

We generally use the present perfect tense to talk about actions that have a link with the present. Nonetheless, it is also possible to use the past tense to express such actions. Also, the adverbs ‘just’, ‘recently’ and ‘lately’ can be used to denote that the action being spoken about happened in the recent past. It is also possible to use the adverb ‘already’ to denote that the action is completed. However, if the sentence happens to be negative, we oftentimes use the adverb ‘yet’ provided the sentence is said in the present perfect tense. Look at the example sentences given below: