Tag: English

Ten Words Every Poet Ought to Know

Every poet, without a shadow of a doubt, wants to be appreciated and acknowledged. However, little do many self-proclaimed poets know there exist different kinds of poets just like there are different kinds of poetic forms. While ‘poet’ seems to be the most commonly used term to denote someone who composes poems, it is very much possible to categorise poets. After you read this post, we believe you will get to know the category you belong to; so if you’re ready, get going!

Past Continuous Versus Past Perfect Continuous

Most of us tend to talk about actions that are already over. In other words, we like to either reminisce about the good moments or discuss our past life events to add value to an ongoing conversation. Hence, it becomes essential for learners to understand the uses of each of the past tenses. Nonetheless, many students face issues dealing with the past continuous and the past perfect continuous. They find it hard to figure what exactly is the difference between these two tenses. Thus, in this post, we have listed all the differences we feel you ought to know.

Connected as One

In two eyes, we observe; in one eye we connect.
Two eyes make judgements that one eye rejects.
Two eyes show this one life, one eye shows the rest.
Two eyes watch the lesson; one eye takes the test.

Conditionals in English

Conditionals allow you to express a wide range of scenarios. You can talk about an event that is unlikely to take place with the help of a conditional. Similarly, you can use conditionals to talk about purely imagined scenarios or hypothetical situations. You can also use conditionals to talk about something likely to happen in the future. Hypothetical outcomes that have got to do with the past are also expressed using conditional sentences. In short, they help you articulate your thoughts in the best possible manner, and that’s why they are considered significant.

Stopping by the Churchyard on My Father’s Birthday

Whose words are these I know I’ve heard?
To read his marker seems absurd,
He will not see me stopping by
Nor holding back the need to cry.

The Graveyard Breathes

Buried a little further, in sodden soils and balding grass, are the manifold agonies hardly ever silenced. These are the shadows that follow me everywhere― etching themselves onto my skin, digging deep with their claws, infiltrating my purpling veins, rusting the way I see the world. They are the screams and wails that scraped my throat. Here lie the sins I haven’t forgiven myself from, perhaps I couldn’t, for ten, twenty, thirty more years―not until the lips that utter the apology learn not to tremble terribly to speak of forgiveness.

Everything About Simple Present Tense

The simple present tense (also known as present simple or present indefinite tense) is not that simple. In fact, this is one of the few tenses that tends to give learners of the English language terrible nightmares. Some learners may get jitters upon hearing the words ‘simple present’. And the reason for this tense being complicated is the fact that it makes use of two forms of a verb: the first form (go, eat, drink, sleep, talk, etc.) and the fifth form (goes, eats, drinks, sleeps, talks, etc.).

The ‘Write’ Puerto Rican

Author Christian Towers began writing stories at the tender age of nine. That was also the age he began creating short comic books incorporating superheroes and other types of action heroes of his creation. ‘This eventually flourished into a love for films and film making. Also, I decided to become a director of films when I grew up at about the same time. Despite opposition from the family, the dream persisted several years. However, as the years passed, and when I entered high school, I felt what mattered to me was not so much making films but being a storyteller in general. That is when being a film director became less important to me, and the author life grew more appealing,’ the Florida-based author, who hails from Puerto Rico, begins, speaking to the Literary Express in an exclusive interaction.

Ten Phrasal Verbs With ‘Hold’

Do you know the word ‘hold’ has got close to fifty meanings? Well, we aren’t kidding a bit! And to make matters worse, this commonly used word can function both as a verb and a noun! While as a noun it has roundabout ten meanings, as a verb it has around forty.

Some More Differences Between Simple Past and Present Perfect

In one of our previous posts, we had explained the rules of the simple present tense and the present perfect tense besides some vital differences between the two. In this lesson, we have listed out some more differences between these tenses that learners ought to keep in mind so they don’t make embarrassing mistakes. To ensure that you comprehend the differences well, we have explained them with the help of several example sentences. So, if you’re ready, let’s begin!

Five Pairs of Homographs You Ought to Know

Homographs, homonyms and homophones might make the English language funny and intriguing, but beyond a shadow of a doubt, they give a tough time to learners who don’t have English as their native language. Even native speakers, at times, tend to struggle with them, but being native, they are naturally inclined to understand them without having to get into the nitty-gritties. However, when they face challenges, they do try to seek help from reliable sources.

Ten Phrasal Verbs With ‘Look’

If you look up the word ‘look’ in a good dictionary, you will end up finding close to thirty meanings. And this word, like many words in English, can function as both a noun and a verb. We, therefore, suggest you click on the link given at the end of this post to get to know all the meanings of this commonly used word. In this post, nevertheless, we have listed ten phrasal verbs with ‘look’ that we feel you ought to know as a learner of the English language. Also, we have stated all the meanings of the phrasal verbs and given several example sentences.

What’s the Difference Between ‘Will’ and ‘Shall’?

In this post, our focus will be on explaining the key differences between the modal verbs ‘will’ and ‘shall’. Many students have the misconception (a wrong opinion) that we use ‘will’ with the second person (you) and third person (he, she, they, it) pronouns and ‘shall’ with the first person pronouns, namely ‘I’ and ‘we’. And while it is true that ‘will’ can be used with any pronoun to denote a future course of action, there are some situations when we cannot use ‘will’. Doing so may not only change the meaning of the sentence, but the sentence may end up being grammatically incorrect as well.

Five English Word Sets That Confuse Every Learner

While ‘price’ denotes the cost of something, ‘prize’ denotes ‘an award offered or won in a competition’. Interestingly, when used as a noun, ‘price’ can also mean ‘a reward offered for capturing or killing a criminal or terrorist’.

Everything About Subject-Verb Agreement

Subject-verb agreement is a grammatical concept according to which there must be a formal agreement or concord between the subject of a sentence (which can be a noun or pronoun) and its verb. This concept, therefore, can also be called ‘verb conjugation’.

Ten Interesting Phrasal Verbs With ‘Play’

Do you know that a good dictionary will give you close to forty meanings of the word ‘play’? Yes, you read that right! You might also find it interesting to note that this cool word is actually derived from the Dutch word ‘plien’, which means ‘to leap for joy’ or ‘to rejoice’. Nevertheless, I don’t think I’d be wrong in saying you will have used this word in more than one way while indulging in generic conversations.

Ten Idioms You Might Want to Use While Conversing

Using idioms while confabulating is the hallmark of a proficient speaker. If you’re looking forward to enhancing your level of vocabulary, then the list of idioms given in this post can surely be of great help to you. I have chosen ten commonly used idioms that you might want to use in day-to-day conversations.