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Stavyah Vatsarah

Stavyah Vatsarah is the nom de plume of an Indian poet, storyteller, and former journalist. He is the founding editor-in-chief of The Literary Juggernaut and dwells in Delhi, India.

Hailing the Sun’s Might on the Day Called Pongal

Here’s Pongal, a festival that celebrates the Sun’s glory, might
Observed well by Indians, its epicentre sure being south
In mainly a state that bears those who employ an old tongue to mouth
Their praises and plaudits to yon great and mighty Sun giving light.

‘Being an Author Isn’t for the Faint of Heart’

The author, who can speak a bit of Spanish and Welsh besides swearing in Punjabi, thanks to his Indian friends at school, also stresses while accepting the reality might be hard, if one does accept, then it will take the sting off the inevitable rejections and negative reviews that all authors get. ‘With rejections, try to be level-headed when they land. First consider whether they are sincere, or whether they are just a form rejection with little thought or substance behind them. If they are sincere, then study them carefully, take on board the comments and try to learn,’ he explains, adding, ‘This is especially important if those rejections go into specific detail about what did and didn’t work. Try and see this as honest advice from top people within the industry, which, in any other scenario, you would probably be paying good money for.’

The Living Death and Silence So Sounded

Soon enough we did notice some huntsmen with arrows, bows,
Who looked keen to put rollicking, glad deer yon day to death;
So like soldiers who safeguard the borders, we formed two rows
In hope we could stall each man that did tread with baited breath.

‘Write’ From the Land of the Rising Sun

Besides, Mr Frankel shares with us that being an English coach and editor, he has to make time for other essential activities as well. While he usually writes at night for a few hours and takes breaks every fifty minutes or so, we learn that during the day too, he gets interesting ideas, which he more often than not jots down immediately. ‘During the day, however, I teach ESL (English as a Second Language) besides editing other writers’ works. Then, I do my own thing, which is writing. When I want to relax, I listen to music, read, or try to sleep. Most writers are sleep deprived at one point or another, and sleep is imperative to being creative.’

The Garbageman

He does inhabit rooms that oft look like glooms,
Oh! But he prizes all he’s got, come what may.
He visits us with brooms, helps each man who dooms,
But I find it sad that he has got no say.
The few months that we were compelled to stay home,
He came, collected our dirt, greeted all in warm tone.

Elvis Lives Across the Lane

His eyes are white, his hair is green
His nose and ears are super clean
While walking on his fingers weak
He never permits his mouth to speak
He buys books at the garment shop
At garment shops he books a mop
He gets paid just one time a year
And he lives his life in no fear

The Supreme Controller’s Mission

And when morning was unfurled,
I did open my eyes to sight
Blueness of the sky so deep and grand
That revealed the Saviour’s power and might.
And I wondered then if there was some site
Where His great vision might never land;
I cognised soon there wouldn’t be light
if He left our little world.

Ten Words Every Poet Ought to Know

Every poet, without a shadow of a doubt, wants to be appreciated and acknowledged. However, little do many self-proclaimed poets know there exist different kinds of poets just like there are different kinds of poetic forms. While ‘poet’ seems to be the most commonly used term to denote someone who composes poems, it is very much possible to categorise poets. After you read this post, we believe you will get to know the category you belong to; so if you’re ready, get going!

The Storm in the Dorm

Yon day we did feel the nature’s rage
When the city was hit by a storm;
And like puppies in a little cage,
We were locked, confined well to our dorm.
Oh, we heard the thunder’s rowdy dance
That did put us in a wondrous trance.

‘It Is Difficult to Be an Indie Author’

Talking about ‘The Mayor’s Daughter’, which was self-published last November, Emma CrowE says it is a YA LGBTQ+ Contemporary Fiction novel. ‘It follows the lives of seventeen-year-olds Chloe Carp and Ash Martin, and the story alternates between the two POVs,’ states the author, who dwells in Wenatchee, a city in north-central Washington.

Impressions and Fire

My face had wilted and withered and waned,
Revealing every pain, emotion, thought;
And there was not one thing I could have gained
Had I not written ’bout what my mind fought.

Forgiveness and Revenge

I am going to stay wounded.
And I shall never trow that
I can forgive those who have wronged me.
This might surprise you, but
my soul will avenge my perpetrators.
And I won’t ever want to think that
forgiveness is an art.

‘If You Can’t Find Something Good to Read, Write It’

A former politician who has written op-eds for several large publications in the United States of America, the fourty-year-old, who is currently residing in the Rocky Mountain Area, the US, tells Stavyah Vatsarah, the roving editor at the Literary Express, in her response email that she worked full time until she got laid off in 2019. In the email, she writes about everything under the Sun – her published works, her hobbies, her family… Quite interestingly, she goes on to state that her first erotica entitled ‘Becoming Monsters’ has zero profanity because she is not too fond of using profane words. ‘If you can’t find something good to read, write it,’ she states.

‘Never Stop Believing in Yourself’

Speaking about her published novella entitled ‘The Unbreakable Thread’ published last year on Amazon, Google Books, and Notion Press, Nissha says it is a romantic fiction in the new adult genre. ‘It is based on a Japanese legend. It deals with two souls who are destined to meet each other,’ she shares with us, clearly not willing to divulge more details.

Message This Year: War With Vices, at Love With Foes

Let this year rouse the knight in you that sleeps;
Each moment let the wakened you rejoice.
New days will bring new beginnings in leaps;
Year after year you will attain more poise.
Make wise decisions, let there be no hate;
You will obtain what you desire, my mate.

With the Lord, You’ll Get All

God bides in such a world, my soul supposes!
World that’s a million times larger than ours…
Thank God, be happy, ponder the world
Where orbs are gardens with flowers…
If you want to trod that world
Live the life here fully.
Do repent your sins.
You’ll get back life.
With the Lord,
You’ll Obtain
All.

Past Continuous Versus Past Perfect Continuous

Most of us tend to talk about actions that are already over. In other words, we like to either reminisce about the good moments or discuss our past life events to add value to an ongoing conversation. Hence, it becomes essential for learners to understand the uses of each of the past tenses. Nonetheless, many students face issues dealing with the past continuous and the past perfect continuous. They find it hard to figure what exactly is the difference between these two tenses. Thus, in this post, we have listed all the differences we feel you ought to know.

The Year That Wasn’t: An Homage to 2020

This year we worked from home, to our workplaces said ‘buh-bye!’
And then at home we joyed with our beloved ménage, kinsfolk.
When March bade to each of us that sad and alarming ‘Hi’,
we did confine ourselves to our homes, thus becoming broke.

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