Author Archives

Vatsarah Stavyah

Vatsarah Stavyah is the nom de plume of an Indian poet, storyteller, and former journalist. He is the founding editor-in-chief of The Literary Juggernaut and dwells as an English coach and writer in Delhi, India.

What Is Diwali? Why Is It Celebrated?

It is said that the God Himself
descended on Earth, took Ram’s form;
Was made to suffer hard we hear
by those who willed to break the norm.
Ram would soon have Ayodhya ruled
had He not been sent into exile;
He dwelt in woods for years fourteen
with his wife and brother agile.

Winter Is Here

Comes again the winter,
bringing to towns darkness
The Sun covered by clouds
tries hard to scatter light;
The light braves the dense fog
Watch I the brumous sight.

Simran Says

Indie author Simran Munot is on cloud nine, for her first-ever solo book entitled ‘Cordially Yours’ is now published. Not only is the book receiving rave reviews from various quarters but is also challenging the beliefs of the twenty-two-year-young Mumbai-based writer, who had initially thought that books on letters don’t do well. Speaking to the Literary Express in an exclusive interaction, Simran, who has previously co-written two poetry books, says the plan to pen down her thoughts and come up with Cordially Yours came long ago, only she wasn’t that confident enough. ‘Cordially Yours is basically a collection of heartfelt open letters. I have seen and read various poetry books, different kinds of novels, and novella but hardly one or two books on letters. A book full of letters is rare and definitely a recent concept. So, I was very sceptical about publishing it,’ she shares.

No Ambiguity

Does not the sky obscure the worlds afar,
Insuring all gods who abide in light?
Summered have we on planet Earth so far;
And we know what’s hard here is for them light.
Mothers have sure mothered billions of souls,
But who begot the first mother d’you know?

‘I Love Idleness, Walking, Being a Flaneur’

What you must understand is that poetry is not simply expressing oneself – not for me. That would seem more suited to an essay. Rather, poetry is a way of being and of seeing as if it were another sense in the way of taste or touch. And with this sense, it becomes a way of relating to life at its smallest as well as its largest. For the poet, it is every day and everywhere. It is who and how you are. Poetry is, at its fullest, a relationship. And the words are the bi-product of that relationship, that way of being. They are the conversations that you, the reader, are allowed to overhear – but they are not in and of themselves the whole thing. Birds stroke distance through the air, spiders build webs, and in the same way, poets write. The significant fact, though, is that what they write; poems are not about, they are not faint reflections, but rather, poems are, are the thing itself – as is the distance, as is the web.

Questions Remain

Answers I have looked for,
But questions still remain;
Chasing me like a cop,
Dim they are sure and lame.

What Do You Ween?

They aver fourteen worlds exist, my friend.
Stories untold, unheard they narrate.
And I look at them with wonder;
To nothing much I relate.
Life never ends I hear;
And that there is fate.
I’ve though no fear,
spite or hate.
Come here.

Once a Head Soldier, Now an Established Author

It was not until author-entrepreneur Christian Warren Freed was deployed to Afghanistan in 2002 that he wrote his debut novel Hammers in the Wind. Speaking to the Literary Express in an exclusive interaction, the fifty-year-old former soldier, who has been to war three times, says that he always wanted to do two things in life: join the army and become an author. Having written over twenty-five science fiction and military fantasy novels, combat memoirs, a pair of how-to books, a children’s book, and several short stories, Mr Freed lets us know that his latest series is a cross amongst Star Wars, Dune, and The Malazan Book of the Fallen. ‘Under Tattered Banners is book five of the Forgotten Gods Tales. It follows the heroes and villains in a universe of seven hundred worlds as they vie for control of it all,’ he tells us.

Techie’s ‘Block’

Author Ian Barker doesn’t remember a time he didn’t write. In fact, one of the school reports from when Mr Barker was about twelve years old says he has ‘an easy style and interesting ideas’. Be that as it may, the author went on to spend almost twenty years working in the IT sector, writing short stories and poems for his amusement. ‘I then discovered that it was easier to write about computers than to fix them, and so, I combined my job and hobby by going to work for a computer magazine,’ says the sixty-one-year-old UK-based author, speaking to the Literary Express in an exclusive interaction.

What if I Told You Two Moons Were Beheld?

What if I told you moons two were beheld
that glimmered and shone like those diamonds mined?
I ween the halcyon days you’d call to mind
when we spoke of the sky, stars, acts withheld.

‘Magical Realism Is a Fantastic Way to Portray Life in Its Fullest Sense’

Author Robin Gregory’s first and recently published novel The Improbable Wonders of Moojie Littleman sprung from a desire to bridge the Eastern and Western philosophies and spirituality. Inspired by her son, who is challenged with disabilities, the book, we learn, is set in Western America of the early 1900s. ‘Writing it was part of my own awakening process,’ begins Ms Gregory, speaking to the Literary Express in an exclusive interaction. She tells us that while this book of hers is the first fiction novel she has ever worked on, she has written creative non-fiction and articles for several magazines including Modern Literature, Ginosko Literary Journal, Massage Magazine, and Coast Weekly.

A Poignant Tale of Love, Loss, Hope, Reunion, and More

Love. Hate. Betrayal. Romance. Horror. Hope. Separation. Reunion. Perry Martin’s debut novel Pretty Flamingo promises all of this and much more. It’s a sublime tale that oscillates primarily between two time periods and two places: the late 1960s set in Brisbane, Australia and the early 2000s largely set in California, the US. It’s a poignant story of loss and separation where, in the end, love reigns supreme. The central idea, nonetheless, revolves around one question: Is it possible that people have ever lived before?

Halloween 2020 with Antonio Ricardo Scozze

We could not get a better author than Antonio Ricardo Scozze to feature as a guest on the occasion of Halloween today, for the writer, who is as mysterious as his nom de plume is (if not more), is trying to create a cohesive, complete world of horror with his writing. Speaking to the Literary Express in an exclusive interaction, Mr Scozze says that unlike most pseudonyms, he uses one because the person (that is, Antonio Ricardo Scozze) happens to be a character in the overarching stories he is composing. ‘His own story will slowly unfold as these stories go on,’ he states with a spooky smile.

Happy Halloween

Howl many a wolf while dire darkness dawns;
Allaying fears of wraiths and ghosts, the like.
Play phantoms ’bout with kids who jump like fawns;
Penumbras soon emerge to cause a strike,
Yelps now the norm, just graves remain, no lawns.

Some More Differences Between Simple Past and Present Perfect

In one of our previous posts, we had explained the rules of the simple present tense and the present perfect tense besides some vital differences between the two. In this lesson, we have listed out some more differences between these tenses that learners ought to keep in mind so they don’t make embarrassing mistakes. To ensure that you comprehend the differences well, we have explained them with the help of several example sentences. So, if you’re ready, let’s begin!

Two Names, One Writer

Indie author Graham Smith might have never stepped into a college or university as a student after leaving school with eight O levels and two highers, but not attending a college never stopped him from pursuing what he loves doing most: writing. Speaking to the Literary Express in an exclusive interaction, the author says he has no formal writing qualifications other than forty years of being an avid reader. He lets us know that he began writing about a decade ago.

The Face Now Forgotten

I mind the days we swam,
the nights we confabbed too.
But face recalled not, damn!
Who could state what to do?

‘Telling’ Tale

When author Jack Turley was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis, a bowel disease similar to Crohn’s, he didn’t lose hope or curse his fate. Instead, he turned an evidently painful episode to one that is now bringing him name and fame from right across the globe. ‘Writing only started getting significant time and attention in 2018 after I was diagnosed with the disease. Incapacitated and in and out of hospital, I couldn’t go to work, exercise, or socialise. Throughout the last two years of illness-imposed isolation, writing was my escape,’ begins the twenty-four-year-young author, speaking to the Literary Express in an exclusive interaction.